Dr. Camille Ragin

Credit: 1.0
Topic 1: Epidemiology of Head & Neck Cancers in Black Populations
Topic 2: Influence of African Genetic Ancestry on Head & Neck Cancer Risk

Dr. Camille Ragin is Professor in the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Fox Chase Cancer Center-Temple University Health System in Philadelphia. Her research focuses on cancer epidemiology and prevention primarily in Black populations. She earned a Ph.D. in Infectious Diseases and Microbiology from the University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health and completed her postdoctoral training and MPH degree in Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. In 2006, she established the African-Caribbean Cancer Consortium (AC3), a research group designed to promote collaboration between cancer researchers who focus their work on the African diaspora. In 2016 Dr. Ragin received the Cancer Control Award from the American Cancer Society, Greater Philadelphia Area. She is a recipient of a strategic planning grant from the National Cancer Institute to establish a Caribbean Regional Center for Research Excellence, focused on cancer research in the Caribbean. She is Principal Investigator (PI) of the Cancer Prevention Project of Philadelphia a multicultural community-based cohort consisting of US- and foreign-born persons of African descent. She is also PI of an international cohort in Jamaica - The LIFE Project - which focuses on cancer and CVD risk. In the US, Dr. Ragin is a member of the Jamaica Diaspora North East Health Sector where she serves as the Diaspora Health Liaison for the State of Pennsylvania.


Topic 1: Epidemiology of Head & Neck Cancers in Black Populations

Outline

Head and neck cancers (HNC) involve multiple sub-sites with distinct etiology involving tobacco, alcohol and/or viruses (Human Papillomavirus or Epstein Barr Virus). This presentation will describe risk factors associated with disease and will focus primarily on Black populations around the world. Comparisons of the age standardised (world) incidence rates and trends according to geographic regions will reveal that there are distinct characteristics of African HNC cases which suggest region-specific risk factors that warrant further investigation through large consortium studies.

Objectives

Participants will understand the risk factors associated with head and neck cancers.


Topic 2: Influence of African Genetic Ancestry on Head & Neck Cancer Risk

Outline

Persons of African ancestry have higher risk of head and neck cancer (HNC) as well as poor survival in comparisons to other racial/ethnic subgroups. This presentation will provide an overview of genetic ancestry and provides examples of how genetic ancestry might influence disease development and poor response to treatment. Many studies suggest that the racial disparities in HNC are attributed to health behaviors, poor SES, and limited access to care, but other factors are also likely contributors.

Objectives

Participants will have an understanding of genetic ancestry and the factors that are likely to influence the development of the disease and response to treatment.